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The Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association (FCHEA) is the trade association for the fuel cell and hydrogen energy industry, and is dedicated to the commercialization of fuel cells and hydrogen energy technologies. Fuel cells and hydrogen energy technologies deliver clean, reliable power to leading edge corporate, academic and public sector users, and FCHEA members are helping to transform our energy future. FCHEA represents the full global supply chain, including universities, government laboratories and agencies, trade associations, fuel cell materials, components and systems manufacturers, hydrogen producers and fuel distributors, utilities and other end users.

Renewable Portfolio Standards

Renewable Portfolio Standards

FCHEA encourages states to adopt Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) that include the full range of clean energy technologies, including fuel cell systems as eligible technologies.  A RPS is a regulation enacted by a state that sets requirements for electricity supply companies to generate a certain amount of electricity within the state from clean sources.

Fuel cells can be an integral aspect of a state or regional emissions reduction plan.  As fuel cells produce electricity through an electrochemical reaction, not combustion, they offer significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions compared to traditional combustion technologies.  Fuel cells also are able to operate on renewably generated fuels, such as biogas produced at a wastewater treatment facility or landfill, or hydrogen produced via solar or wind powered electrolysis.  As such, states should recognize the contribution that fuel cells can provide by incorporating them into their RPS.

Some examples of states that have adopted fuel cells into their RPS include:

  • Connecticut, Delaware, New York, and North Carolina among others currently allow all fuel cell systems to qualify under their RPS.

  • Other states like Massachusetts and California only allow fuel cells to qualify under their RPS if they are fueled from renewable sources